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Current Rate Information for 2020 - What you Need to Know!

Jun 03, 2020

COVID-19.  As a result of COVID-19 and until some point in the future, CWSNC has reconnected all customers disconnected for non-payment, suspended all future disconnects, and has ceased collecting and billing late payment charges. 

While we know that there is no good time for a rate increase, we also understand the impacts of a rate increase during this unprecedented period and are committed to working with our customers during and after the state of emergency. Once the pandemic-related orders are lifted by the Governor's office and the NC Utilities Commission, we will provide payment plans or payment arrangements for customers impacted financially by the COVID-29 virus.  That said, customers may now contact the Company at any time to request a payment arrangement or payment plan.

About CWSNC

On June 28, 2019, Carolina Water Service, Inc. of North Carolina (CWSNC) filed a rate case with the North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC). Docket number is W-354, Sub 364.

CWSNC is headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The Company presently serves approximately 34,915 water customers and 21,403 sewer customers in North Carolina and operates approximately 93 water systems and 38 sewer systems in the State.

The Company’s service territory spans 38 counties in North Carolina, from Corolla in Currituck County to Bear Paw in Cherokee County. CWSNC applied for an adjustment in water and sewer rates and charges for all of its service areas in North Carolina.

 A list of systems and their customer counts is shown on the last pages of this document.

About CWSNC’s Rate Filing

CWSNC’s previous rate case (W-354, Sub 360) was filed on April 27, 2018 and an order was issued approving the consolidated rates in effect since February 21, 2019.

Customers’ rates are based on a thorough cost, operations, and quality of service review by the NCUC Public Staff, NC Attorney General’s office, and other intervenors in the proceeding.  In addition, customers may provide comments and feedback during the public hearings held throughout the Company’s service territory during the course of the rate case process.  The proper level of rates to be charged by the Company to facilitate proper service to its customers are ultimately approved by the NCUC commissioners. 

The cost of service and tariff rate proposals are more fully explained in CWSNC’s rate filing documentation which is made publicly available through the Commission’s website. All parties interested in this matter may obtain information either directly from CWSNC or by addressing the Secretary of the North Carolina Utilities Commission, 430 North Salisbury Street, Dobbs Building, 5th Floor, Raleigh, NC 27603-5918.  Customers may also visit the NCUC website and search Docket “W-354 Sub 364” at https://starw1.ncuc.net/NCUC/page/Dockets/portal.aspx.

The new rates are effective March 31, 2020.

What drove CWSNC to file for a rate increase?

We have the responsibility to upgrade our infrastructure and make necessary improvements to continue to provide quality service.  We also must comply with changing state and federal environmental regulations and maintain a safe working environment for our employees.  It is well-accepted that water and sewer infrastructure across the country is aging and in need of significant investment to maintain proper service and address environmental concerns.  Many of the Company’s systems are reaching the end of their useful life and must be replaced, rehabilitated, or upgraded to avoid system failures.  To that end, CWSNC has invested over $22 million in capital improvements since its last rate case, which were not included in your prior rates.

It is important to note that all investments driving the requested increase have already been incurred by the Company, and are benefitting customers before a change in rates is implemented.

Will the WSIC/SSIC surcharges continue?

As of March 31, 2020 ,the WSIC/SSIC surcharges will reset to $0.  These charges may resume in the future should the Company continue to invest in eligible improvements in its water and sewer infrastructure  and would be subject to review and approval by the Commission.

Why are some rate increases higher or lower than others?

The Company has been working toward levelizing rates for customers across its service areas for the past several rate cases.  This practice is common in the utility industry (gas, electric), and this enables the Company to spread the impact of its costs and improvements across a larger customer base, which results in smaller, incremental increases over time.  Levelized rates ultimately benefit all CWSNC customers and protects small standalone groups of ratepayers from solely bearing the cost of large infrastructure investments. 

CWSNC understands that no one likes rate increases and makes every effort to keep operating expenses to a reasonable minimum while maintaining a system that produces safe and reliable service.  However, a rate increase is needed to finance ongoing operations, capital investments, and allow the Company the opportunity to earn a reasonable return on its investment. 

Prior rates did not reflect rising costs that have resulted from increased investment, inflation and compliance with expanding environmental and regulatory requirements.

Corolla Light and Monteray Shores subdivisions (Sewer):  Corolla/Monteray rates have been held flat for the past several rate cases by the Commission, as the remaining Uniform Sewer rates have moved closer to the Corolla/Monteray rates.  In this filing, the costs for the consolidated Uniform Sewer tariff group have now reached levels that allow for Corolla/Monteray’s rates to be consolidated with the rest of the Uniform Sewer group’s rates.

Corolla Light and Monteray Shores rates were approved to be fully consolidated into the CWSNC Uniform Sewer tariff group as of March 31, 2020.  The average customer with 5,448 gallons billed per month will see a decrease of 4.78% on their monthly bill.

CONTINUATION OF EXISTING TAX CREDITS:

What is the “Federal Tax Refund”?

With the passing of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”), the federal tax rate applicable to CWSNC decreased effective 1/1/2018.  As the Company’s rates did not adjust to capture this change until February 2019, the Company refunded excess taxes recovered from customer rates over that time period – January 1, 2018 until February 20, 2019.  This refund ran for one year (until February 2020) and includes interest. 

These funds have been fully returned to customers between February 2019 and February 2020 and the surcredit is no longer applicable.

What is the “Federal Deferred Tax Refund”?

With the passing of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”), the federal tax rate applicable to CWSNC decreased effective 1/1/2018.  The Company is required to reserve funds for expected future tax payments (deferred taxes), which are now lower due to the tax rate decrease.  Therefore, the portion of the reserve that is no longer payable to the federal government is being refunded to customers.  The refund will run for two years and includes interest.

The refund has been recalculated as of March 31, 2020 to be 0.953% of the base and volumetric charges on each customer’s monthly bill.

What is changing with my water and sewer rates?

The table below shows a comparison of average water and sewer bills at old and new rates for a 5/8” residential customer.

Entity

Avg. Billed Gallons

Present Monthly Bill

New Monthly Bill

Amount Change

% Change

Uniform Water

3,607

$ 53.07

$ 58.75

$ 5.68

11%

Uniform Sewer

3,569

$ 59.23

$ 75.29

$ 16.06

27%

BF/FH/TC Water

4,129

$ 32.22

$ 34.64

$ 2.42

8%

BF/FH/TC Sewer

N/A - Flat Rate

$ 50.46

$ 53.91

$ 3.45

7%


A comparison of the new authorized rates for Uniform Water is below.

Residential Water

 

Old Rates

New Rates

 

Meter Size

Base Rate

Usage Rate

Base Rate

Usage Rate

 

Unmetered

$ 53.58

 

$ 58.54

 

 

5/8"

$ 27.53

$ 7.08

$ 28.92

$8.27

 

3/4"

$ 27.53

$ 7.08

$ 28.92

$8.27

 

1"

$ 68.83

$ 7.08

$ 72.30

$8.27

 

1.5"

$ 137.65

$ 7.08

$ 144.60

$8.27

 

2"

$ 220.24

$ 7.08

$ 231.36

$8.27

Commercial Water

 

 

 

 

 

5/8"

$ 27.53

$ 7.08

$ 28.92

$8.27

 

3/4"

$ 27.53

$ 7.08

$ 28.92

$8.27

 

1"

$ 68.83

$ 7.08

$ 72.30

$8.27

 

1.5"

$ 137.65

$ 7.08

$ 144.60

$8.27

 

2"

$ 220.24

$ 7.08

$ 231.36

$8.27

 

3"

$ 412.95

$ 7.08

$ 433.80

$8.27

 

4"

$ 688.25

$ 7.08

$ 723.00

$8.27

 

6"

$ 1,376.50

$ 7.08

$ 1,446.00

$8.27

Availability

 

$12.35

 

$13.60

 

 

A comparison of the new authorized rates for Uniform Sewer is below.

Residential Sewer

 

Old Rates

New Rates

 

Meter Size

Base Rate

Usage Rate

Base Rate

Usage Rate

 

Flat

$ 57.82

 

$ 73.73

 

 

Base Charge

$ 46.31

$ 3.62

$ 58.91

$4.59

Commercial Sewer

 

 

 

 

 

Flat

$ 57.82

$ 73.73

 

5/8" - 3/4"

$ 46.31

$ 3.62

$ 58.91

$4.59

 

1"

$ 115.78

$ 3.62

$ 147.28

$4.59

 

1.5"

$ 231.55

$ 3.62

$ 294.55

$4.59

 

2"

$ 370.48

$ 3.62

$ 471.28

$4.59

 

3"

$ 694.65

$ 3.62

$ 883.65

$4.59

 

4"

$ 1,157.75

$ 3.62

$ 1,472.75

$4.59

 

6"

$ 2,315.50

$ 3.62

$ 2,945.50

$4.59

 

A comparison of the new authorized rates for BF/FH/TC Water is below.

Residential Water

 

Old Rates

New Rates

 

Meter Size

Base Rate

Usage Rate

Base Rate

Usage Rate

 

5/8" - 3/4"

$ 16.74

$ 3.75

$ 17.30

$ 4.20

 

1"

$ 41.85

$ 3.75

$ 43.25

$ 4.20

 

1.5"

$ 83.70

$ 3.75

$ 86.50

$ 4.20

 

2"

$ 133.92

$ 3.75

$ 138.40

$ 4.20

Commercial Water

 

 

 

 

 

5/8" - 3/4"

$ 16.74

$ 3.75

$ 17.30

$ 4.20

 

1"

$ 41.85

$ 3.75

$ 43.25

$ 4.20

 

1.5"

$ 83.70

$ 3.75

$ 86.50

$ 4.20

 

2"

$ 133.92

$ 3.75

$ 138.40

$ 4.20

Availability

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3.28

 

$3.55

 

 

A comparison of the new authorized rates for BF/FH/TC Sewer is below.

Residential Sewer

 

Old Rates

New Rates

 

Meter Size

Base Rate

Usage Rate

Base Rate

Usage Rate

 

Flat

$ 50.46

 

$ 53.91

 

 

Bulk Sewer

$ 50.46

 

$ 53.91

 

 

Apartments

$ 50.46

 

$ 53.91

 

Commercial Sewer

 

 

 

 

 

5/8"

$ 44.58

$ 1.43

$ 44.62

$ 2.25

 

1"

$ 111.45

$ 1.43

$ 111.55

$ 2.25

 

1.5"

$ 222.90

$ 1.43

$ 223.10

$ 2.25

 

2"

$ 356.64

$ 1.43

$ 356.96

$ 2.25

Availability

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$2.65

 

$2.85

 

Please do not hesitate to contact me at deb.clark@corixgroup.com if you have any further questions.

Deborah S. Clark
Communications and Community Relations Manager

 


Governor Roy Cooper Requests Utilities to Suspend Disconnects for 60 Additional Days

Jun 02, 2020

Governor Roy Cooper has requested utilities to suspend disconnects for an additional 60 days with his Executive Order 124 on May 30, 2020.

Carolina Water Service, Inc. of North Carolina will continue to suspend disconnects due to non-payment until we receive the Governor's Executive Order to restart.

However, please do not accrue an excessive balance. This will make it hard for payment when the disconnects for non-payment do restart. If you need help with a payment plan or payment arrangement now, please call our Customer Service Team at (800) 525-7990.

https://files.nc.gov/governor/documents/files/EO142-Temp-Prohibitions-on-Evictions-and-Extending-Prohibition-on-Utility-Shut-Offs.pdf


The decisions we're making today.

May 07, 2020
As the COVID-19 crisis evolves, we as individuals, organizations, and communities will have important decisions to make. Decisions that affect us all. 

We responded quickly to the crisis, putting the safety of our customers and employees first. We determined early on that our decisions would be guided by scientific and medical facts, and our actions would be cautious and measured. And when in doubt, we would always err on the side of safety. 

The decision to stay the course... for now.


Based on those principles, we began working remotely, adopted physical distancing schedules for our operators and took other measures to protect everyone.

Those guiding principles remain firmly in place, but we recognize and appreciate the desire to begin opening our economies. We feel it too. And, as things begin to return to normal, please understand that we’ll continue to operate remotely and take precautions to protect you and our employees.

That decision is supported by the knowledge that all our systems continue to function normally, and all necessary maintenance is being done. More importantly, we believe we’re well prepared to continue providing those essential water, wastewater, and energy services you rely on, as we work through this crisis.

The decision to stay safe.


While our services continue to function normally, our employees, like so many, are adapting to the new "not normal." For now, all our employees will continue to work remotely; they will observe physical distancing; and they’ll use the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) in field and plant work.

For customers, this means we’ll continue our policy of suspending the disconnection of services and late fees; our offices will remain closed; and our staff will continue to observe physical distancing protocols when performing meter reads and maintenance in your area. We’ll keep you informed as the situation evolves.




As Patty Potty says, “those so-called ‘flushable’ wipes might flush down, but they sure don’t flush out, honey.”



We are taking appropriate, science-based actions to mitigate the impacts of COVID-19. We're committed to this unprecedented global effort and implore you do your part as well. If you require additional information, please contact us!  Thank you!

Important Information for Reopening your Business, Church, School, Rental Property, or Vacation Home Post COVID – 19 Pandemic

Apr 30, 2020

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of our customers may have temporarily closed businesses, churches, school buildings, or a vacation rental/home. Water that is held in unused pipes while the buildings are closed can become stagnant, and since stagnant water is a potential health risk and can impact water quality, it is necessary to systematically flush your plumbing. These instructions will help by providing a systematic approach on how to do a complete flush.

Thorough flushing includes operating all sink, tub, shower, and toilet fixtures. Safety equipment, such as eye washes, safety showers, and fire sprinkler systems may also require assessment and necessary maintenance. 

Water features inside and outside buildings, hot tubs/spas, and cooling towers also can require attention. Please keep this information available when you start the process of reopening once it is safe to do so.

NOTE: Some buildings have water treatment systems and all those treatment devices need to be cleaned, flushed and maintained as part of the starting up process. After flushing, your water filters need to be replaced. If you have any point of entry water treatment system such as a water softener or filter, please refer to the instruction manual for replacement of the filter.

Flushing Instructions

Please complete the following steps in the order set out below. Finish each step completely before moving on to the next step. 

  • Flush ALL cold-water taps for at least 5 minutes
    Begin the cold-water flushing, open ALL of the cold-water fixtures, flush each toilet at least one time. Run all cold-water fixtures for at least five minutes. Shut water off after five minutes. This does include the water in your refrigerator water dispenser.
    Flushing should begin at the water service entrance and proceed through the building to the end points of the plumbing system in the building(s). Depending on flow and pressure you may need to increase the flushing time to ensure all the stagnant water has been flushed.
  • Flush ALL hot water taps for 15 minutes
    Once the cold-water lines have been flushed begin the hot water flushing procedure by opening the hot water taps in your bathroom(s). Open ALL hot water taps including lavatory (sink) fixtures, hot water bath fixtures, and any other hot water fixtures, such as kitchens, wet bars, etc.
    Run these hot water fixtures for at least 15 minutes. Shut water off after 15 minutes. Depending on the size of the hot water tank you may need to flush longer to ensure the water in the tank has drained and fresh water has refilled the tank. These steps should be effective at removing contaminants from the water heater. However, for information on draining and cleaning the water heater please consult the manufacturer.
  • Flush ALL remaining Appliances and Faucets
    Open any remaining fixtures such as hose bibs, external faucets or fixtures not used for drinking for at least five minutes to finish the plumbing system flushing. Take additional steps to remove water from other appliances.
    This includes:
    Ice Makers Dishwashers Washing Machines Humidifiers CPAP Machines
    Oral, Medical or Health Care Devices Baby Formula Water Filters Water Softeners Filters, point of use and whole house.
  • Remove ice from ice maker bin and discard 2 additional batches of ice.
  • Run empty dishwasher and washing machine once on rinse cycle.
  • Ongoing flushes
    Periodic flushing is important to improve the water quality. Full building ongoing flushes proceed the same as the initial flush except water tanks do not need to be drained and hot water flushing times are the same as cold water flushing times.

It is a good idea during this flushing time if you have chlorinated water to measure chlorine residual.

Discoloration may occur during flushing; this is expected and not a health issue.  Any lingering smell, which is expected, is not a health issue.  During the initial flushing, it is a good concept to wear protective respiratory equipment.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has very detailed information on reactivating plumbing systems after dormant conditions on its website at the link below:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/php/building-water-system.html.


NORTH CAROLINA UTILITIES COMMISSION Order Suspending Utility Disconnects for Non-Payment, Allowing Reconnection, and Waiving Certain Fees.

Apr 10, 2020

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA UTILITIES COMMISSION RALEIGH DOCKET NO. M-100, SUB 158 BEFORE THE NORTH CAROLINA UTILITIES COMMISSION

In the Matter of Investigation of Necessary and Appropriate Responses to the Novel Coronavirus COVID-19

ORDER SUSPENDING UTILITY DISCONNECTIONS FOR NON-PAYMENT, ALLOWING RECONNECTION, AND WAIVING CERTAIN FEES

BY THE COMMISSION: On March 10, 2020, Governor Roy Cooper issued Executive Order No. 116 declaring a State of Emergency in North Carolina to coordinate response and protective actions to prevent the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

In so doing, the Governor ordered state agencies to cooperate in the implementation of the provisions of the executive order. On March 14, 2020, Governor Cooper, finding that further action was necessary to protect the health and safety of the residents of North Carolina, slow the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak, reduce the number of people infected, and avoid strain on our health care system, issued Executive Order No. 117 prohibiting mass gatherings of more than 100 persons to limit the spread of COVID-19. On March 16, 2020, the Commission acted in response to the declared State of Emergency and consistent with the Governor’s executive orders to assist in preventing the spread of coronavirus by suspending all hearings scheduled to be held prior to

April 13, 2020. On March 17, 2020, Governor Cooper further issued Executive Order No. 118 closing restaurants and bars for dine-in service. In addition, that executive order recognizes and provides relief for the numerous workers in North Carolina who may have lost wages in restaurants and meeting places due to mass gathering restrictions.

Most of the major electric, natural gas, and water and wastewater utilities regulated by the Commission — including Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Duke Energy Progress, LLC; Virginia Electric and Power Company, Inc., d/b/a Dominion Energy North Carolina; Piedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc.; Public Service Company of North Carolina, Inc.; Aqua NC, Inc; and Carolina Water Service, Inc. of North Carolina — have notified the Commission that they are suspending disconnection of utility services for non-payment in recognition of the above restrictions and to avoid creating additional hardships for their customers.

https://files.nc.gov/governor/documents/files/EO124-Utilities-Evictions-Financial-Services.pdf

Keeping you informed about the essential utility services you rely on every day

Apr 09, 2020
At Carolina Water Service of NC, our employees work every day to provide our communities with safe and reliable water and wastewater services. In the face of COVID-19, that commitment has never been stronger.
 
“Our employees take great pride in providing essential utility services to our customers during these unprecedented times.”
Catherine Heigel, EVP & COO Corix Regulated Utilities
 
We’re also committed to keeping you continually informed of our efforts—and how you can help us, and your community, get through this together.
Please observe Physical Distancing
 
Our field employees continue to perform meter reads and maintenance in your area, while practicing mandatory Physical Distancing (min. 2m/6ft). If you see someone working in your neighborhood, please extend the same consideration—for everyone’s safety.
 
Billing considerations
 
We realize many customers are facing unexpected financial hardship as a result of COVID-19. As announced March 10, we have suspended late fee payments and disconnections for nonpayment.
 
In the meantime, we encourage all customers to stay as current as possible with bill payments, to avoid large balances that may be harder to manage later.
Scammers are still in business
 
A particularly ugly side of this crisis is scammers taking advantage of people when they’re most vulnerable. Please be extra vigilant for these phone, email, and online scams.
 
Disconnection Threat
Never respond to a threat to disconnect your services. Disconnections have been suspended for the time being.
 
Requested Payment
Never respond to an urgent request for payment, or purchase of a prepaid debit card. Our trusted payment options remain unchanged.
 
Personal Information
Never provide personal information to someone claiming to be from a utility company. We would never request this by email or online form.
 
And while Physical Distancing should be your primary concern when allowing anyone into your home, if one of our field employees needs access to your water meter, they will first show you their company identification.
 
If you have any doubts whatsoever about the legitimacy of a phone call, email, or service visit—STOP—hang-up, delete the email, and contact Customer Care directly to report your concerns.
 
Patty Potty says ‘this ain’t no time for nasty plumbing’
 
Keep using those sanitary wipes, but PLEASE put them in the trash, NOT down the toilet.
patty-do-not-flush-horz
Customer Care
 
Our Customer Care staff are ready by email or phone to answer any questions about your utility services. You may experience longer hold times as we help other customers, and we appreciate your patience.
 
We’re taking appropriate, science-based actions to mitigate the impacts of COVID-19.  We’re committed to this unprecedented global effort and implore you do your part as well. If you require more information, please contact Customer Care.
 
Thank you.



COVID-19 Preparedness Update

Mar 23, 2020

UPDATED 3/23

*Important* In light of the continuing COVID-19 crisis we are extending our policy of suspending disconnections and late fees until further notice. No customers will be denied essential water, wastewater or energy service.

************************

At the Corix Group of Companies, which includes Carolina Water Service of North Carolina, the health and safety of our employees, customers, and communities is our top priority. This commitment guides our efforts to mitigate any public health or business impacts the COVID-19 outbreak may cause as we continue to provide safe and reliable water and wastewater services.

Core to our COVID-19 response is the creation of a company-wide Incident Command Task Force, charged with planning and executing the recommendations, actions, and protocols below. As this is an evolving situation, please continue to refer to this webpage for updates.

COVID-19 and Water and Wastewater

We are continually monitoring and following directives from primary public health authorities – the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Public Health Agency of Canada, and the World Health Organization (WHO) – for any new guidance on water and wastewater treatment protocols. These authorities have declared:

 •  A source of clean, reliable water for drinking and personal hygiene is considered a fundamental necessity in the fight against COVID-19.
 •  According the World Health Organization(WHO) there is no evidence COVID-19 is transmitted through drinking water or sewage.
 •  Water treatment and handling protocols used in North American water and wastewater plants are highly effective against biological pathogens. 

For further information about COVID-19 and drinking water and wastewater, please refer to this statement from the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA).

Our Water Treatment Protocols

 •  All our systems are regulated by state, provincial, and/or federal water agencies. We continually meet or exceed established regulatory requirements with regards to water treatment and testing.
 •  Most of our systems source their water from deep underground wells.
 •  We use treatment protocols (including filtration and chemicals, such as chlorine, if required) to address any pathogens present in source water before it is distributed to customers.
 •  Our systems operators and field workers follow strict protocols in their operation of water and wastewater systems. This includes the mandatory use of protective gear and clothing, which is highly effective against the transmission of water-borne pathogens.

Company-Wide Actions

Our Incident Command Task Force has mandated the following company-wide actions:

 • Suspension of Customer Disconnections and Late Fees
In recognition of the essential services we provide, we have suspended disconnection and late fees as of March 10, 2020. Release here.

 • Remote Work
Remote work has been identified as core to the company’s Social Distancing practices, and all staff able to work remotely are doing so as of March 16, 2020.

 • Customer Contact Centers
Our customer contact centers are fully operational, but longer than normal hold times may occur during the current conditions. Please bear with us as we work through all inquiries. We appreciate everyone’s patience during this rapidly evolving and unprecedented situation.

 • Office Closures
We remain fully operational and performing routine maintenance to ensure our systems are functioning normally, however, all our offices are closed until at least March 30, 2020. If you need to deliver something to one of our offices, please call/email first to arrange delivery or make alternate arrangements.

 • Facility Emergency Action Plans
We are reviewing and updating our Emergency Action Plans to ensure appropriate measures are taken to safeguard employees and customers should one of our employees test positive for COVID-19. No infections have been reported to date.

 • Critical Inventories and Spare Parts
Chemicals and critical spare parts inventories are being assessed to ensure supplies are on-hand to maintain essential business operations.

 • Staffing Continuity
Essential job functions are being identified to prepare for potential large-scale absenteeism in our workplace.

 • Business Travel
We have suspended all business travel until further notice. This suspension does not include essential operational and field activities that can be performed using recommended social distancing measures and established workplace health and safety protocols.

 • Resource Sharing with other Water Service Providers
We have been reaching out to neighboring private and public water services, to recommend system operator and field technician sharing assistance should either become subject to staffing shortages.

The Corix Group of Companies takes pride in providing the communities we serve with safe and reliable water and wastewater services. We are taking the appropriate, science-based actions to mitigate the impacts the COVID-19 on our employees and customers. We are committed to the global effort to protect public health and ask that you do your part as well. Thank you.

Should you require more information regarding this notice, please reach out to us via phone at (800) 525-7990 or via e-mail at customerservice@carolinawaterservicenc.com 

 

No Wipes in the Pipes!

Mar 15, 2020

Disinfectant wet wipes, paper towels and toilet paper are flying off the shelves. These products help keep us clean and reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus. But when we remember that products like baby wipes and wet wipes are not as “flushable” as typically advertised, it’s no surprise that we’re now at a greater risk for sewer blockages in our communities.

If TP isn’t available, it’s easy to reach for an alternative – but keep in mind these wipes need to stay out of our pipes, period. Keep a bin next to the toilet for disposal! Do with wet wipes what you’d do with a baby’s diaper or other hygiene products.

When “flushable” wipes enter your plumbing system, they don’t disintegrate like regular ol’ toilet paper. They often hold together better than a paper towel and they require more water to travel the distance from inside your house to the buried sewer lines outside. At some point in this journey, you’re going to get a clog! If wipes survive the trip to the water treatment plant, they just clog up the giant pumps there, creating even bigger problems.

So now that we’re never flushing our wet wipes again, are you wondering what else doesn’t belong down the drain? Read this quick list of items we’re all guilty of tossing… Now here’s to helping our pipes stay clog-free.

  1. Q-Tips and cotton balls – They will never disintegrate like TP, so don’t flush ‘em.
  2. Feminine hygiene products – Pads and tampons are meant to absorb liquids, not break down in them. They are never safe to flush.
  3. Dental floss – Floss might look harmless, but this stuff is tough. It can create a net when it’s swishing around in your pipes and wrap around parts of your septic system, even burning out the motor.
  4. Diapers – No no no no no! Diaper pails exist for a reason.
  5. Condoms – They’re designed to never break down in water. Put it in the trash.
  6. Medication – Toilet water doesn’t break down the prescription drugs you flush, meaning that whatever you’re taking will end up in the environment. Throw into the trash or return it to a pharmacy.
  7. Kitty Litter – Some cat litter brands advertise as being flushable, but don’t believe the hype. All it does is make water more difficult to purify on the other end.
  8. Cigarettes – Ciggie butts are full of chemicals! Don’t smoke them and don’t flush them.
  9. Hair – When flushed, hair acts like dental floss and creates a net that gets caught on everything. Plus, it never dissolves in water, no matter how long its there.
  10. Bleach – It’s too harsh of a chemical to use as a part of your routine cleaning, try getting toilet stains out with vinegar instead.

And of course, no fats, oils or grease, either! But more on that later.


FATS, OILS, and GREASE - OH MY!

Jan 08, 2020

Bacon! Sizzling in the frying pan, browning to perfection, ready to be applied to that lettuce, bacon and tomato sandwich – YUM!

 But what should you do with the remaining grease? Pour it down the sink!?!?

 Simple! Follow our guidelines for how to properly dispose of fats, oils, and grease or FOG!

First, NEVER pour fats, oils or grease down the sink!  This could result in a Sanitary Sewer Overflow.

Sanitary Sewer Overflows (SSO) occur when untreated wastewater flows from the collection system and into the environment due to abnormal causes.

A wide variety of factors can cause an SSO but the leading cause for decades has been Fats, Oils, and Grease (FOG). These substances, when poured down the drain, solidify in the sewer pipes and cause blockages that do not allow normal wastewater to flow.

If the blockage becomes large enough, normal wastewater flow will begin to back up and release elsewhere, such as a manhole or cleanout.  The untreated wastewater then flows freely into storm drains, creeks and lakes that can have a severe impact. YUCK!

 Here are some examples of FOG that you should never put down the drain.

FATS

· Cheeses

· Ice Cream

· Butter

· Meat Trimmings

 OILS

· Salad Dressings

· Cooking Oil

· Vegetable Oil

· Canola Oil

· Olive Oil

· Corn Oil

GREASE

· Gravy

· Bacon/Sausage

· Mayonnaise

So, how do you properly dispose of fog? Easy!  Scrape all pans into garbage. Then Dry Wipe pan with paper towel and dispose of in garbage. Pour liquid oil or grease into solid container (ex: glass jar, metal coffee can etc.) and allow to cool and solidify. Then toss in garbage. Contact your local government to see if they have a cooking oil recycling program.

 

A new major factor that has been contributing to SSOs has been Flushable wipes. Although these wipes are flushable, they do not break down like normal tissue paper does. As a result, these wipes get stuck in the sewer pipes and the pumps that move the wastewater. If you use these wipes, please dispose of them in the garbage not the toilet.

Enjoy your bacon but be responsible and properly dispose of that grease!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Brrrr! It is Cold Outside and so are your Pipes

Dec 19, 2019
Brrr. Winter is upon us and the temperatures continue to drop! Now is the time for you to protect your pipes against old man winter and freezing. 

Winter weather brings icy winds and dipping temperatures which can do a lot of damage to your home by freezing pipes and leaving you without flowing water.

There are many precautions you can take now to help you avoid the expense and inconvenience of frozen pipes during an extended cold spell.

Before Freezing Weather

1. Disconnect and drain hoses from outside faucets. If your home has a separate shut-off valve for outside faucets (usually located in the basement or crawl space) then use it to shut the water off to your outside faucets. Then go outside and turn on the faucets to drain water from the line. If your home does not have a separate shut-off valve for outside faucets, then wrap each outside faucet with insulation or newspaper.

2. Insulate pipes or faucets in unheated areas such as the garage, crawl space, or attic. Check with your local home improvement store for which materials to use to insulate your pipes.

3. Show household members how to turn off water to the house in case of emergencies. The main shut-off valve is often located near the water heater or the washing machine. If a pipe bursts anywhere in the house – kitchen, bath, basement, or crawl space – this valve turns it off.

4. Turn off and drain irrigation systems and backflow devices. Wrap backflow devices with insulating material.

5. Cover foundation vents with foam blocks, thickly folded newspaper, or cardboard.

Just a little prevention may help save you from the heartache and pain of frozen pipes and the need to pay a plumber.


Statement Regarding PFOA/PFOS

Dec 06, 2019

At Carolina Water Service of NC we are committed to providing safe, reliable and cost-effective water and wastewater services that ensure the ongoing health and safety of every community we serve. Ongoing industry-standard testing of our processes and products helps us meet that goal.

Results of the regular testing required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state regulatory agencies are made available to customers each year in Consumer Confidence Reports found on our website. Each of our systems publish test results with comparisons to the EPA established Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) standards. We are proud of our record of compliance with federal and state health and environmental regulations to date and intend to keep that record intact.

Two compounds that are not currently regulated by the EPA, PFOA and PFOS, compounds created in the 1930s and used widely in consumer and commercial applications (e.g., Teflon), are among a class of synthetic chemicals (known as perfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS) that accumulate over time in the environment and our bodies. Studies are ongoing regarding the potential contaminative effect of these chemicals. We are taking proactive steps to address the issues surrounding them in anticipation of new regulations at the federal and/or state level.

These steps begin with an evaluation of all systems of greatest potential impact and an immediate plan for the best way forward. This plan includes:

  • Evaluating the use of various raw water sources required to meet volume demands coupled with additional steps to understand the relative importance of each source in overall system operation;
  • Making prudent capital investments as necessary;
  • Reviewing and evaluating related operational expenses where necessary; and
  • Modifying or removing sources of raw water supply.

Developing this plan for all our systems is ongoing and complex, necessitating coordination with various local, state and federal stakeholders. While we believe the costs of any remediation actions should be borne by the polluters, we are committed to addressing the issue proactively and look forward to the EPA and state agencies issuing clear and firm guidance that allows us to target our activity.

Our goal is to maximize the use of our resources to the greatest benefit of the communities we serve in the most cost-effective manner possible while ensuring the delivery of safe and reliable service to all our customers.  

For more information visit: https://www.epa.gov/pfas


Third Party Bill Payment Services Not Recommend - Use MyUtilityConnect

Nov 14, 2019

The only bill pay website affiliated with the Company is MyUtilityConnect. If you prefer to pay your bill online, MyUtilityConnect is our official bill payment portal and the best way to ensure that your bill will be paid on time. 

Please be advised that we are not affiliated or partnered with third party bill payment services such as Doxo or Mint. These companies may charge additional “convenience” fees to customers. We also cannot control when we receive payments from these companies, and this may result in a late payment fee being applied to your account - even disconnection due to non-payment.

We urge our customers to make their online bill payments from MyUtilityConnect to avoid these consequences.


Prevent Frozen Pipes!

Nov 12, 2019

Brrr. It is getting colder and colder with winter nipping at our noses! Now is the time to take precautions to prevent frozen pipes. Below are some tips to help you prepare for the winter season!
Winter weather brings icy winds and dipping temperatures which can do a lot of damage to your home by freezing pipes and leaving you without flowing water. There are many precautions you can take now to help you avoid the expense and inconvenience of frozen pipes during an extended cold spell.

frozen
Before Freezing Weather
1. Disconnect and drain hoses from outside faucets. If your home has a separate shut-off valve for outside faucets (usually located in the basement or crawl space) then use it to shut the water off to your outside faucets. Then go outside and turn on the faucets to drain water from the line. If your home does not have a separate shut-off valve for outside faucets, then wrap each outside faucet with insulation or newspaper.

2. Insulate pipes or faucets in unheated areas such as the garage, crawl space, or attic. Check with your local home improvement store for which materials to use to insulate your pipes.

3. Show household members how to turn off water to the house in case of emergencies. The main shut-off valve is often located near the water heater or the washing machine. If a pipe bursts anywhere in the house – kitchen, bath, basement, or crawl space – this valve turns it off.

4. Turn off and drain irrigation systems and backflow devices. Wrap backflow devices with insulating material.

5. Cover foundation vents with foam blocks, thickly folded newspaper, or cardboard.

During Freezing Weather
1. Leave the heat on at least 55 degrees and open cupboard doors under sinks, especially where plumbing is in outside walls, to let interior heat warm the pipes.

2. Temporarily, keep a steady drip of cold water at an inside faucet farthest from the meter. This keeps water moving, making it less likely to freeze.

3. If you are away for any length of time, you may consider shutting off your home’s water to reduce the chances of frozen or broken pipes. Contact your water provider for more information on how to do this.

4. Have your plumber and water provider’s telephone number handy. During an extended cold spell, your pipes might freeze despite the best precautions.

If Your Pipes Freeze
1. Determine which pipe(s) are frozen. If some faucets work but others don’t, that means pipes inside your home are likely frozen. If none of your faucets work, there may be a problem at the street – contact your water provider.

2. Find the frozen pipe(s) and attempt to thaw them with a hair dryer using a low setting. Wave the hair dryer back and forth along the frozen area. NEVER thaw a frozen pipe with an open flame.

3. Shut off water and power (or gas) to the water heater if you have a leak or a broken pipe. Contact your water provider if you are unable to find the shut-off valve or the valve doesn’t work. Check with a plumber or home improvement store for leak repair supplies



Imagine a Day Without Water

Oct 23, 2019

Millions of Americans take water service for granted every day.

  • Turn on the tap, and clean water flows out. Flush the toilet, and dirty water goes away.
  • When you have reliable water service, you don’t have to think twice about the infrastructure that brings water to your home or business, and then safely returns water to the environment – but we all should.
  • The reality is, America’s water infrastructure is aging and failing—and there are even communities that have never had access to infrastructure in the first place.
  • On Imagine a Day Without Water, we ask everyone to consider what their day would be like if they couldn’t turn on the tap and get clean drinking water, or if you flushed the toilet and wastewater didn’t go anywhere. What would that day be like?

A day without water is a public health and safety crisis.

  • A day without water means firefighters can’t do their jobs, hospitals would be unsanitary, and no one could wash dirty dishes or clothes.
  • Living without water is an economic crisis too: a single nationwide day without water service would put $43.5 billion in economic activity at risk.

Water infrastructure is the lifelines of our communities.

  • Our water infrastructure supports every facet of our daily lives, but our water infrastructure is facing unprecedented challenges.
  • Demographic changes and climate pressures, including natural disasters like droughts, flooding, and wildfires, threaten our infrastructure and increase the possibility of a day without water.
  • Some communities are grappling with toxic algae blooms and pollution from chemicals or raw sewage, others are facing startling groundwater depletion.
  • These challenges look different to different communities and will require local solutions, but it’s clear that reinvestment in our water systems must be a national priority. 

Strong leadership on water is key to securing our future.

  • Imagine a Day Without Water is an opportunity to share why water is important to you, your business, your community.
  • We can speak out together, with one voice, and ask public officials at every level of government to take responsibility for our water today and tomorrow.
  • We can help secure a better future for the millions of Americans who don’t have reliable water service today, and ensure a reliable water future for generations to come.
  • Investing in our water is investing in a future where no American will have to imagine a day without water.

What is a boil water advisory?

Oct 10, 2019

What is a Boil Water Advisory?
A Boil Water Advisory is a public health recommendation from Carolina Water Service, Inc. of North Carolina (CWSNC) advising customers to boil their tap water before using it. This is in response to an event that could have allowed contaminants to enter the water distribution system. Because the water quality is unknown, customers should assume the water is unsafe to drink and take the necessary precautions listed below.

When does CWSNC issue a Boil Water Advisory?
Typically, we issue a Boil Water Advisory after a water main break repair, small or widespread loss of pressure in our water system, or a natural disaster.

In some cases, our crews can repair a water main while maintaining adequate pressure to prevent contamination from entering the water distribution system. (When we do a repair in this way, no Boil Water Advisory is needed.)

When we issue a Boil Water Advisory, we notify only the customers affected. If the risk of contamination is widespread, CWSNC will put information on our website,  notify customers using our My Utility Connect application, social media, etc. to inform the public.

How long will a Boil Water Advisory be in effect?
An advisory will remain in effect until bacteriological test samples show the water is safe to drink. Bacteriological testing typically takes 24 to 28 hours to complete.

What should I do during a Boil Water Advisory?
Boil tap water before using it for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth or preparing food. Bring tap water to a rolling boil for at least 1 minute and let it cool.

Should I use my coffee maker, water or ice dispenser when a boil water advisory is in effect?
During an advisory, do not use water from any appliance connected to your water lines. This includes water and ice dispensers in your refrigerator/freezer. Use boiled or bottled water to make coffee and ice.

How should I wash dishes during a Boil Water Advisory?
Household dishwashers are generally safe to use if the water reaches a final rinse temperature of at least 150 degrees Fahrenheit or if the dishwasher has a sanitizing cycle.

To wash dishes by hand:
Use boiled water; or wash and rinse dishes as normal. Then in a separate basin, add 1 teaspoon of unscented household bleach for each gallon of warm water. Soak dishes in basin for a least 1 minute. Let dishes air dry completely.

Should I bathe or shower during a Boil Water Advisory?
It is safe to bath or shower, but be careful not to swallow any water. Use caution when bathing babies and young children. Consider giving them a sponge bath to reduce the chance of them swallowing water.

Can I wash my hands during a boil water advisory?
Yes, vigorous handwashing with soap and your tap water is safe for basic personal hygiene. However, if you are washing your hands to prepare food, you should use boiled (then cooled) water, disinfected or bottled water with hand washing soap.

What if I drank some of the water before I found out about the advisory?
This advisory was issued as a precaution, so your risk of getting sick is very low. However, if you begin to have a fever, diarrhea, or nausea you should seek medical attention.

How will I know when the advisory or notice has been lifted?
CWSNC will rescind the Boil Water Advisory when the results from the testing have been confirmed that the water is safe to drink. You will receive your notification the same way you were informed of the advisory.

Is a Boil Water ADVISORY the same as a Boil Water NOTICE? NO!
We issue a Boil Water Advisory when water contamination is possible. In an advisory, we recommend that affected customers boil CWSNC water before consumption or use bottled water. A Boil Water Advisory is voluntarily issued when water contamination is possible.We provide the notification as a courtesy to keep our customers safe just in case.  During an advisory we recommend that customers vigorously boil water for at least 1 minute before consumption or drink bottled water.

We issue a Boil Water Notice when contamination is confirmed in the water system. During a notice, affected customers must boil their water before consumption or use bottled water. A Boil Water Notice is required by law to be issued when contamination is confirmed in the water system. During a notice, affected customers must boil water before consumption or use bottled water.

If you have any questions, call our Customer Service Department at 800) 525-7990.


How to Find and Fix Pesky Household Leaks!

Mar 18, 2019

Did you know that an average household's plumbing leaks can account for nearly 10,000 gallons of water being wasted each year? This adds up to almost 1 trillion gallons of water being wasted annually nationwide! Easy-to-fix leaks around your house could be wasting 90 gallons of water or more, every day.

Fixing easily corrected water leaks can save homeowners about 10 percent on their water bills. So how do you know if your home hides costly and wasteful leaks? Here's a list of tips from the EPA.

1. Check your utility bill: Try examining your utility bill for January or February. It’s likely that a family of four has a serious leak problem if its winter water use exceeds 10,000 gallons (or 13.4 CCF) per month. You can also look for spikes - is your water use a lot higher this month than it was last month?

2. Read your water meter: Find your water meter, which is usually near the curb in front of your home but can be inside your home (e.g., in the basement) in cold climates. Use a screwdriver to remove the lid on your meter, which is heavy and usually marked “water.” Now that you’ve found the meter, take a reading during a period when no water is being used. If the meter does not read exactly the same after two hours, you probably have a leak.

3. Test your toilet: Put a few drops of food coloring into the tank at the back of your toilet and let it sit for 10 minutes. If the color shows up in your bowl, you have a leak. Make sure to flush afterward to avoid staining, and consider replacing your old toilet flapper if it is torn or worn.

4. Water world: Examine faucet gaskets and pipe fittings for any water on the outside of the pipe to check for surface leaks. Another telltale sign of a leak is decreased or inconsistent water pressure. If you notice a problem with your faucets, call a plumber.

5. Pipe problems: The pipes that deliver your water are a common source of leaks. If you own an older home, it is more likely to have plumbing problems. Replace galvanized pipes with plastic if possible, and insulate exposed pipes and those in the attic or basement if possible. Pipes can break or crack with age, pressure, or freezing.

Leaks are often easy to fix, requiring only a few tools and hardware that can pay for themselves in water savings. Adding new WaterSense labeled fixtures and other high-efficiency appliances will help further improve your home's water usage.

FALW_logo_no_date_20192 


Protect your pipes! When in doubt, throw it out!

Feb 14, 2019

Oils and grease are wastes that our sewer system cannot handle and should not be discarded down the drain. Grease, fats, and oils will clog sewer lines (the same way bad cholesterol can clog heart arteries), causing sewage back-ups and flooding. Sewage back-ups can damage personal and our wastewater treatment system.

Carolina Water Service Inc., or North Carolina inspects and clears sewer pipes to prevent spills but we can't do this without your help. Drain excess grease or cooking oil into a can, cool and toss. Wipe any leftover grease from the pan with a paper towel and throw the paper towel away.

The same goes for our toilets. If you flush items down the toilet that don't belong there, you are inviting clogs and overflows. Even products labeled as "flushable" do not decompose in the sewer system and can contribute to clogging. Don't flush paper towels, baby wipes, adult or baby diapers, hair, cotton swabs, feminine products or dental floss. Only put toilet paper down the toilet. 


#ClickClean and Choose Paperless Billing

Aug 06, 2018

PAPERLESSnorthcarolina

Get rid of paper clutter. Switch to Paperless Billing.

Paperless billing is the easy, secure way to view your bill. The option for free Paperless Billing will email your full viewable invoice directly to you on the date the bill is issued, instead of through the mail. 

If you are interested in free Paperless Billing, please sign up thru your Online Account Access or contact Customer Service.

Phone: (866) 842-8432
Fax: (866) 842-8348
Email: customerservice@carolinawaterservicenc.com
Monday - Friday: 9:30AM - 6:00PM EST