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Statement Regarding PFOA/PFOS

Dec 06, 2019

At Carolina Water Service of NC we are committed to providing safe, reliable and cost-effective water and wastewater services that ensure the ongoing health and safety of every community we serve. Ongoing industry-standard testing of our processes and products helps us meet that goal.

Results of the regular testing required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state regulatory agencies are made available to customers each year in Consumer Confidence Reports found on our website. Each of our systems publish test results with comparisons to the EPA established Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) standards. We are proud of our record of compliance with federal and state health and environmental regulations to date and intend to keep that record intact.

Two compounds that are not currently regulated by the EPA, PFOA and PFOS, compounds created in the 1930s and used widely in consumer and commercial applications (e.g., Teflon), are among a class of synthetic chemicals (known as perfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS) that accumulate over time in the environment and our bodies. Studies are ongoing regarding the potential contaminative effect of these chemicals. We are taking proactive steps to address the issues surrounding them in anticipation of new regulations at the federal and/or state level.

These steps begin with an evaluation of all systems of greatest potential impact and an immediate plan for the best way forward. This plan includes:

  • Evaluating the use of various raw water sources required to meet volume demands coupled with additional steps to understand the relative importance of each source in overall system operation;
  • Making prudent capital investments as necessary;
  • Reviewing and evaluating related operational expenses where necessary; and
  • Modifying or removing sources of raw water supply.

Developing this plan for all our systems is ongoing and complex, necessitating coordination with various local, state and federal stakeholders. While we believe the costs of any remediation actions should be borne by the polluters, we are committed to addressing the issue proactively and look forward to the EPA and state agencies issuing clear and firm guidance that allows us to target our activity.

Our goal is to maximize the use of our resources to the greatest benefit of the communities we serve in the most cost-effective manner possible while ensuring the delivery of safe and reliable service to all our customers.  

For more information visit: https://www.epa.gov/pfas


Third Party Bill Payment Services Not Recommend - Use MyUtilityConnect

Nov 14, 2019

The only bill pay website affiliated with the Company is MyUtilityConnect. If you prefer to pay your bill online, MyUtilityConnect is our official bill payment portal and the best way to ensure that your bill will be paid on time. 

Please be advised that we are not affiliated or partnered with third party bill payment services such as Doxo or Mint. These companies may charge additional “convenience” fees to customers. We also cannot control when we receive payments from these companies, and this may result in a late payment fee being applied to your account - even disconnection due to non-payment.

We urge our customers to make their online bill payments from MyUtilityConnect to avoid these consequences.


Prevent Frozen Pipes!

Nov 12, 2019

Brrr. It is getting colder and colder with winter nipping at our noses! Now is the time to take precautions to prevent frozen pipes. Below are some tips to help you prepare for the winter season!
Winter weather brings icy winds and dipping temperatures which can do a lot of damage to your home by freezing pipes and leaving you without flowing water. There are many precautions you can take now to help you avoid the expense and inconvenience of frozen pipes during an extended cold spell.

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Before Freezing Weather
1. Disconnect and drain hoses from outside faucets. If your home has a separate shut-off valve for outside faucets (usually located in the basement or crawl space) then use it to shut the water off to your outside faucets. Then go outside and turn on the faucets to drain water from the line. If your home does not have a separate shut-off valve for outside faucets, then wrap each outside faucet with insulation or newspaper.

2. Insulate pipes or faucets in unheated areas such as the garage, crawl space, or attic. Check with your local home improvement store for which materials to use to insulate your pipes.

3. Show household members how to turn off water to the house in case of emergencies. The main shut-off valve is often located near the water heater or the washing machine. If a pipe bursts anywhere in the house – kitchen, bath, basement, or crawl space – this valve turns it off.

4. Turn off and drain irrigation systems and backflow devices. Wrap backflow devices with insulating material.

5. Cover foundation vents with foam blocks, thickly folded newspaper, or cardboard.

During Freezing Weather
1. Leave the heat on at least 55 degrees and open cupboard doors under sinks, especially where plumbing is in outside walls, to let interior heat warm the pipes.

2. Temporarily, keep a steady drip of cold water at an inside faucet farthest from the meter. This keeps water moving, making it less likely to freeze.

3. If you are away for any length of time, you may consider shutting off your home’s water to reduce the chances of frozen or broken pipes. Contact your water provider for more information on how to do this.

4. Have your plumber and water provider’s telephone number handy. During an extended cold spell, your pipes might freeze despite the best precautions.

If Your Pipes Freeze
1. Determine which pipe(s) are frozen. If some faucets work but others don’t, that means pipes inside your home are likely frozen. If none of your faucets work, there may be a problem at the street – contact your water provider.

2. Find the frozen pipe(s) and attempt to thaw them with a hair dryer using a low setting. Wave the hair dryer back and forth along the frozen area. NEVER thaw a frozen pipe with an open flame.

3. Shut off water and power (or gas) to the water heater if you have a leak or a broken pipe. Contact your water provider if you are unable to find the shut-off valve or the valve doesn’t work. Check with a plumber or home improvement store for leak repair supplies



Imagine a Day Without Water

Oct 23, 2019

Millions of Americans take water service for granted every day.

  • Turn on the tap, and clean water flows out. Flush the toilet, and dirty water goes away.
  • When you have reliable water service, you don’t have to think twice about the infrastructure that brings water to your home or business, and then safely returns water to the environment – but we all should.
  • The reality is, America’s water infrastructure is aging and failing—and there are even communities that have never had access to infrastructure in the first place.
  • On Imagine a Day Without Water, we ask everyone to consider what their day would be like if they couldn’t turn on the tap and get clean drinking water, or if you flushed the toilet and wastewater didn’t go anywhere. What would that day be like?

A day without water is a public health and safety crisis.

  • A day without water means firefighters can’t do their jobs, hospitals would be unsanitary, and no one could wash dirty dishes or clothes.
  • Living without water is an economic crisis too: a single nationwide day without water service would put $43.5 billion in economic activity at risk.

Water infrastructure is the lifelines of our communities.

  • Our water infrastructure supports every facet of our daily lives, but our water infrastructure is facing unprecedented challenges.
  • Demographic changes and climate pressures, including natural disasters like droughts, flooding, and wildfires, threaten our infrastructure and increase the possibility of a day without water.
  • Some communities are grappling with toxic algae blooms and pollution from chemicals or raw sewage, others are facing startling groundwater depletion.
  • These challenges look different to different communities and will require local solutions, but it’s clear that reinvestment in our water systems must be a national priority. 

Strong leadership on water is key to securing our future.

  • Imagine a Day Without Water is an opportunity to share why water is important to you, your business, your community.
  • We can speak out together, with one voice, and ask public officials at every level of government to take responsibility for our water today and tomorrow.
  • We can help secure a better future for the millions of Americans who don’t have reliable water service today, and ensure a reliable water future for generations to come.
  • Investing in our water is investing in a future where no American will have to imagine a day without water.

What is a boil water advisory?

Oct 10, 2019

What is a Boil Water Advisory?
A Boil Water Advisory is a public health recommendation from Carolina Water Service, Inc. of North Carolina (CWSNC) advising customers to boil their tap water before using it. This is in response to an event that could have allowed contaminants to enter the water distribution system. Because the water quality is unknown, customers should assume the water is unsafe to drink and take the necessary precautions listed below.

When does CWSNC issue a Boil Water Advisory?
Typically, we issue a Boil Water Advisory after a water main break repair, small or widespread loss of pressure in our water system, or a natural disaster.

In some cases, our crews can repair a water main while maintaining adequate pressure to prevent contamination from entering the water distribution system. (When we do a repair in this way, no Boil Water Advisory is needed.)

When we issue a Boil Water Advisory, we notify only the customers affected. If the risk of contamination is widespread, CWSNC will put information on our website,  notify customers using our My Utility Connect application, social media, etc. to inform the public.

How long will a Boil Water Advisory be in effect?
An advisory will remain in effect until bacteriological test samples show the water is safe to drink. Bacteriological testing typically takes 24 to 28 hours to complete.

What should I do during a Boil Water Advisory?
Boil tap water before using it for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth or preparing food. Bring tap water to a rolling boil for at least 1 minute and let it cool.

Should I use my coffee maker, water or ice dispenser when a boil water advisory is in effect?
During an advisory, do not use water from any appliance connected to your water lines. This includes water and ice dispensers in your refrigerator/freezer. Use boiled or bottled water to make coffee and ice.

How should I wash dishes during a Boil Water Advisory?
Household dishwashers are generally safe to use if the water reaches a final rinse temperature of at least 150 degrees Fahrenheit or if the dishwasher has a sanitizing cycle.

To wash dishes by hand:
Use boiled water; or wash and rinse dishes as normal. Then in a separate basin, add 1 teaspoon of unscented household bleach for each gallon of warm water. Soak dishes in basin for a least 1 minute. Let dishes air dry completely.

Should I bathe or shower during a Boil Water Advisory?
It is safe to bath or shower, but be careful not to swallow any water. Use caution when bathing babies and young children. Consider giving them a sponge bath to reduce the chance of them swallowing water.

Can I wash my hands during a boil water advisory?
Yes, vigorous handwashing with soap and your tap water is safe for basic personal hygiene. However, if you are washing your hands to prepare food, you should use boiled (then cooled) water, disinfected or bottled water with hand washing soap.

What if I drank some of the water before I found out about the advisory?
This advisory was issued as a precaution, so your risk of getting sick is very low. However, if you begin to have a fever, diarrhea, or nausea you should seek medical attention.

How will I know when the advisory or notice has been lifted?
CWSNC will rescind the Boil Water Advisory when the results from the testing have been confirmed that the water is safe to drink. You will receive your notification the same way you were informed of the advisory.

Is a Boil Water ADVISORY the same as a Boil Water NOTICE? NO!
We issue a Boil Water Advisory when water contamination is possible. In an advisory, we recommend that affected customers boil CWSNC water before consumption or use bottled water. A Boil Water Advisory is voluntarily issued when water contamination is possible.We provide the notification as a courtesy to keep our customers safe just in case.  During an advisory we recommend that customers vigorously boil water for at least 1 minute before consumption or drink bottled water.

We issue a Boil Water Notice when contamination is confirmed in the water system. During a notice, affected customers must boil their water before consumption or use bottled water. A Boil Water Notice is required by law to be issued when contamination is confirmed in the water system. During a notice, affected customers must boil water before consumption or use bottled water.

If you have any questions, call our Customer Service Department at 800) 525-7990.


How to Find and Fix Pesky Household Leaks!

Mar 18, 2019

Did you know that an average household's plumbing leaks can account for nearly 10,000 gallons of water being wasted each year? This adds up to almost 1 trillion gallons of water being wasted annually nationwide! Easy-to-fix leaks around your house could be wasting 90 gallons of water or more, every day.

Fixing easily corrected water leaks can save homeowners about 10 percent on their water bills. So how do you know if your home hides costly and wasteful leaks? Here's a list of tips from the EPA.

1. Check your utility bill: Try examining your utility bill for January or February. It’s likely that a family of four has a serious leak problem if its winter water use exceeds 10,000 gallons (or 13.4 CCF) per month. You can also look for spikes - is your water use a lot higher this month than it was last month?

2. Read your water meter: Find your water meter, which is usually near the curb in front of your home but can be inside your home (e.g., in the basement) in cold climates. Use a screwdriver to remove the lid on your meter, which is heavy and usually marked “water.” Now that you’ve found the meter, take a reading during a period when no water is being used. If the meter does not read exactly the same after two hours, you probably have a leak.

3. Test your toilet: Put a few drops of food coloring into the tank at the back of your toilet and let it sit for 10 minutes. If the color shows up in your bowl, you have a leak. Make sure to flush afterward to avoid staining, and consider replacing your old toilet flapper if it is torn or worn.

4. Water world: Examine faucet gaskets and pipe fittings for any water on the outside of the pipe to check for surface leaks. Another telltale sign of a leak is decreased or inconsistent water pressure. If you notice a problem with your faucets, call a plumber.

5. Pipe problems: The pipes that deliver your water are a common source of leaks. If you own an older home, it is more likely to have plumbing problems. Replace galvanized pipes with plastic if possible, and insulate exposed pipes and those in the attic or basement if possible. Pipes can break or crack with age, pressure, or freezing.

Leaks are often easy to fix, requiring only a few tools and hardware that can pay for themselves in water savings. Adding new WaterSense labeled fixtures and other high-efficiency appliances will help further improve your home's water usage.

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Protect your pipes! When in doubt, throw it out!

Feb 14, 2019

Oils and grease are wastes that our sewer system cannot handle and should not be discarded down the drain. Grease, fats, and oils will clog sewer lines (the same way bad cholesterol can clog heart arteries), causing sewage back-ups and flooding. Sewage back-ups can damage personal and our wastewater treatment system.

Carolina Water Service Inc., or North Carolina inspects and clears sewer pipes to prevent spills but we can't do this without your help. Drain excess grease or cooking oil into a can, cool and toss. Wipe any leftover grease from the pan with a paper towel and throw the paper towel away.

The same goes for our toilets. If you flush items down the toilet that don't belong there, you are inviting clogs and overflows. Even products labeled as "flushable" do not decompose in the sewer system and can contribute to clogging. Don't flush paper towels, baby wipes, adult or baby diapers, hair, cotton swabs, feminine products or dental floss. Only put toilet paper down the toilet. 


#ClickClean and Choose Paperless Billing

Aug 06, 2018

PAPERLESSnorthcarolina

Get rid of paper clutter. Switch to Paperless Billing.

Paperless billing is the easy, secure way to view your bill. The option for free Paperless Billing will email your full viewable invoice directly to you on the date the bill is issued, instead of through the mail. 

If you are interested in free Paperless Billing, please sign up thru your Online Account Access or contact Customer Service.

Phone: (866) 842-8432
Fax: (866) 842-8348
Email: customerservice@carolinawaterservicenc.com
Monday - Friday: 9:30AM - 6:00PM EST